Armando Hasudungan
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Parkinson’s Art Competition Finalists

Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Although Parkinson’s disease is known more commonly for it’s movement problems, many people with Parkinson’s also go through non-motor symptoms such as pain, depression and problems with memory and sleep. This can significantly impact one’s quality of life.

World Parkinson’s Day is April 11th 2016. To bring more awareness of Parkinson’s disease we have launched a global art competition and we are so happy to have received so many entries from around the world, people from all walks of life; who bring different stories and share their parkinson’s story from different perspectives. We truely appreciate all who have participated and hope you can participate in future competitions.

It was a tuff decision, but here we will showcase some of the finalists. The winner and runners up will be announced on the 11th of April.


It’s Not Easy (2nd Place)

– Nadia Wirawendra Kusumoprojo


Here is how you can help:

  • You can purchase the orginial artworks listed below with all proceeds going to a selected parkinson’s disease organisation. The money will go towards research and towards helping families with parkinson’s disease. Please email: [email protected] if you are interested in purchasing any of the artworks below
  • You can also purchase the artworks from the online store: http://armandohasudungan.storenvy.com/collections/1310766-parkinson-art-competition-finalists
  • Donate to a parkinson’s organisation near you! Here are some suggestions:
    • EDPA: http://www.epda.eu.com/en/about-the-epda/our-organisation/fundraising/
  • Share the images, share the stories, share this post
  • #worldparkinsonsday2016 #parkinsonsdisease #shakingpalsy #armandohasudungan

Behold, Humanity!

Behold, Humanity copy

‘Behold, All That is Humanity��������������������������������������������������������������� showcases the anatomy of the human brain, from an anterior view. As if the owner of the brain would be gazing straight at the viewer of the artwork. The work aims to recognise the beauty and highlight the functional fragility of the organ, as essentially, these neurons have developed what we know today as civilisation over the course of evolution and integrally, of human history. The fluidity of this concept and it’s ephemeral reality – the susceptibility to disease of this amazing component of the human body system – is emphasised by the brain appearing to float in a water-like medium.

– Kiana Elliott


Butterfly (3rd Place)

butterfly

I was about 10 when my mom was diagnosed with early onset Parkinson’s. Thankfully family life is quite normal despite it being with us nearly a decade (that being said, even my youngest sister could tell you the difference between Mirapexin and Sinemet and my brother reckons we should have a �����parking�������sons sticker for the car to excuse any poor parking skills as mom rushes around!). What has become apparent to me is how the smallest of problems can have enormous consequences. Without dopamine, a small chemical in the grand scheme of things, so many features of the body fails to work…. hence I find myself comparing it to �������������The Butterfly Effect�����. I also like this metaphor as butterflies are such fragile, delicate creatures. They seem lack the characteristic protective shells of other insects and seem to take longer to get to wherever it is they are going. Like my mom, they are a little slower to function in the morning. Sometimes they have to sit and rest awhile. Sometimes they tremble. But in the end they muster up the courage and resolve to do whatever they need to do. And there is something beautiful about that

– Réiltín Tynan


Take Control

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The artwork is a digital medium and the name of the piece is �������Take Control.” The inspiration for this piece came from a friend I knew. Sometimes I would feel stressed and depressed for no apparent reason. My friend would always tell me, “You���ll be fine. You’re just letting your thoughts control you.��� and she was right. When I saw this competition, I immediately thought about what she said. Physically and maybe even mentally, it seems those who had Parkinson’s disease were being controlled. It’s like they had no power over their own body. That is how I came with the idea of drawing a robot which is attached to several wires labelled with various symptoms of the disease. The wires are like the disease, it commands the body and mind to do as it is labelled. The robot is shown detaching one of the wires from his head; this was a way I could illustrate someone taking control over something. It’s like a treatment, if you try to help yourself, one day others will find a way to help you.

– Socheata Sean


Painful Tulip

parkinsons

Parkinson’s Disease, known as “shaking palsy” is characterised in most patients by the primary motor symptomps such as progressively developing tremor, rigidity, slowness of movement and postural instability. The major secondary symptom associated with the disease is depression, which may be present in more than 50 % of the population. The tulip is the floral symbol of hope for people living with Parkinson’s disease.

– Amanda Pramacitra


A Third Person’s Perspective

Nafisa Mahbub- A Third Persons Perspective copy

As I have never encountered what it is like to have Parkinson’s, or witness a loved one go through this neurodegenerative disease, it was difficult for me to find inspiration. Therefore, I decided that I would take a “third-person�������s viewpoint”: taking inspiration from what I already know about Parkinson’s Disease. As I am a university student who majored in neuroscience, I decided to make science my muse. A combination of my scientific knowledge and my artistic skill was used to make this artwork. I used acrylic paint and vector design as my mediums. Now I would like to explain the content of my artwork.

The central element of my work is the trees that is slowly deteriorating, with leaves vanishing and branches falling. This represents the brain (specifically the substantia nigra), that starts out healthy but over the years neuron death occur. Accordingly, not enough dopamine is released into the synaptic cleft, thus, neurons stop firing. The healthy side of the tree is lit with glowing lights; but as your eyes train through to the failing side, these lights start to decline. These lights represent the firing of neurons. Finally, surrounding the tree is my artistic take on the structure of dopamine. I decided to encircle the tree with dopamine structure because the lack of dopamine is one of the main causes, and L-DOPA is currently one of the main medications used to treat this disease. In my art, I have tried to illustrate in a simple manner the complexity of the disease. The tree is used as an important symbol of life all over the world. I wanted to illustrate what happens if the tree is still intact and still, but the leaves are gone and the branches are broken.

– Nafisa Mahbub


Hold Me (& Look Closer) (1st Place)

parkinsons

As a child I watched my grandfather live with Parkinson’s in his final years. I knew little- I knew most old people couldn’t walk very well, but he was different. I remembered most how his hands would shake- as he tried to feed himself, as he held his mug. Dropping things, spilling drinks- constantly apologising. As a medical student now, I understand more. “Shaking Palsy”. The basal ganglia. The full scope and progression of the disease- I wish I did, back then. I drew this as a self-portrait.

My hand in the forefront of the drawing- in my mind’s eye, for me, the hallmark of Parkinson’s Disease. Trying to imagine myself, old, in the shoes of someone who suffers. Chaotic, swirls, scribbles- letting my hand run freely, out of control- trying to settle into some semblance of form. Words, written between the lines (look closer), of how I would feel, words I might hear from my doctor- which I might not remember or understand. Words I might say to my carers. Words I might whisper to myself at night- wishing that I might be heard (hear me out). Every person deserves to live with dignity, kindness, love and care. Through this artwork, I wish for the viewer to put themselves in the shaky slippers of those like my grandfather, and reflect on how we can see past the tremors, to see the person- the beautiful soul and what they are going through.

– Mao Fong Lim


The Mask

“I don’t think he likes me very much,” I heard the med reg joke. A final year medical student can do a lot, but a third year medical student’s job is to plaster yourself against the wall or curtain. Silent spectating as a sport. I silently spectacted as the registrar spoke to the family. They are emotional. They are expressive. Only the patient is stony-faced.  I know he has Parkinson���s. Everyone knows. I try to look into his eyes. The man does not react to much, but beside his teary family I can see a reflection of emotion.  Later, the family is gone. The physiotherapist is by the bedside. The medical students from the other end of the ward happen to �����pass by����� to look for a gait.  “I don’t think he likes me very much,” the med reg jokes, out of hearing range of anybody who would take offence. The intern makes an obligatory laugh. They’re not cruel people. They know the reality of things. Parkinson���s is terrible, and every day they must put on masks to cope. When you put on the mask enough, the mask sticks. I see the patient a few more times on the ward, always in passing.  I wonder what he’s thinking. - Jia Hui, Lee

“I don’t think he likes me very much,” I heard the med reg joke.
A final year medical student can do a lot, but a third year medical student’s job is to plaster yourself against the wall or curtain. Silent spectating as a sport. I silently spectacted as the registrar spoke to the family. They are emotional. They are expressive. Only the patient is stony-faced.

I know he has Parkinson’s. Everyone knows. I try to look into his eyes. The man does not react to much, but beside his teary family I can see a reflection of emotion.
Later, the family is gone. The physiotherapist is by the bedside. The medical students from the other end of the ward happen to “pass by” to look for a gait.
�������I don���t think he likes me very much,” the med reg jokes, out of hearing range of anybody who would take offence. The intern makes an obligatory laugh. They’re not cruel people. They know the reality of things. Parkinson�������������s is terrible, and every day they must put on masks to cope. When you put on the mask enough, the mask sticks.

I see the patient a few more times on the ward, always in passing.

I wonder what he’s thinking.

– Jia Hui, Lee


Connection

Connection

This is a colored pencil image of my right arm, shoulder, back and neck. Through the past 17 years of diagnosis the first and continuous struggle was with my right arm. From past photographs I have come to recognize that I hold my right arm stiffly at my side. It did not swing continuous or naturally when I walked. It expanded to pain when I laid on my right side, moving to the inability to any overhead movement.

The variety of exercises assigned and manipulation used through physical therapy confused me and this image started to form. Unless manipulated I was unsuccessful in completing movement with my right arm. So at my request my physical therapist would place her hand where I was to sense movement. With my eyes closed I would attempt to connect with this movement. With tears flowing I felt a connection, through my neck, shoulder, back and arm for probably the first time in years. Through the use of art therapy and mindfulness I have identified an awareness of observing and accepting any movement without judgment or reaction. These lines, colors and shades permit me to connect with movement.

– Sam Erwin


Living With Parkinson’s Disease

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Having had symptoms of Juvenile Parkinson’s Disease since the age of 14, I am aware first hand about the challenges the disease encompasses. Often, I am surprised to find how little awareness exists in relation to Parkinson’s Disease.

Art has always been a therapeutic and creative outlet for me, by conveying my own experience I aimed to portray some of the barriers associated with Parkinson’s through the medium of film.

The images were drawn digitally on the iPad using Adobe Illustrator and Sketch. I included pictures of myself to enhance the autobiographical nature and add personal incentive of the piece, in addition I narrated the story to contribute to its authenticity. I used iMovie editing software to bring movement to these pictures, this motion echoes the cardinal motor features of Parkinson���s Disease and accurately documents Parkinson’s Disease.

– Niall Byrne

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